Cuyahoga County to Award $3.3 Million in American Rescue Plan Act Funds to Cuyahoga Arts & Culture and Assembly for the Arts

Cuyahoga County to Award $3.3 Million in American Rescue Plan Act Funds to Cuyahoga Arts & Culture and Assembly for the Arts

Funds will be distributed to support arts nonprofits, creative workers, and for-profit creative businesses

CLEVELAND (March 28, 2022) – Cuyahoga County has proposed an allocation of $3.3 million in American Rescue Plan Act funds to help bolster the creative economy, County Executive Armond Budish and County Council President Pernel Jones, Jr. announced today.

The relief funding was secured through a collaborative effort of Cuyahoga Arts & Culture (CAC) and Assembly for the Arts. Following approval by County Council, funds will be evenly divided between CAC and Assembly for the Arts. CAC will develop guidelines for distribution to eligible CAC nonprofit grant recipients that have a primary mission of arts and culture. Assembly will similarly develop guidelines for distribution to arts-related small businesses and creative workers.

“The economic vitality of our region depends on the revival of creative workers–individual artists, cultural nonprofits and for-profit cultural businesses. The County’s investment will help bring us back from historic losses.  We thank the County Executive and County Council for channeling resources to strengthen the creative sector. As we have seen with prior investments in arts and culture organizations, each dollar invested increases the size of the overall pie” said Jeremy Johnson, president of Assembly for the Arts.

CAC’s Executive Director Jill M. Paulsen said the funding is critically important to the hard-hit arts and culture sector in the county. A CAC report on the impact of COVID on the nonprofit arts sector in the county shows 65 organizations that receive support from CAC have lost $171 million in revenue and more than 5,000 workers have been laid off, furloughed, or faced reduced hours since March 2020. Prior to the pandemic, the creative economy in the Cleveland MSA generated $9.1 billion annually.

“The creative economy is core to the identity of Cuyahoga County, and it has been slower than other industries to begin to recover from the pandemic. We appreciate County Executive Budish, County Council President Jones and other leadership at the county for recognizing the importance of arts and culture and for understanding the needs of nonprofit organizations of all sizes,” Paulsen said. “Every bit of funding helps nonprofits arts organizations recover so they can serve the community well into the future.”


Get Involved

Get Involved

Learn from Issues

If you are interested in being more politically active, or at least more publicly engaged, the best place to start is by building the foundation.  CPAC has developed some content on arts- and culture-related policy that provides a good place to start.

Know Your Public Officials - and What They Are About

For many of us, our interaction with our public officials ends when we submit our ballot; however engaging in our community leaders’ decisions should not stop there. Public officials are in place to represent our best interests. As their constituents, we should take the time to learn more about them. What are her goals? What is his voting record? What is on the agenda at the next public meeting? Before you send an email or make a phone call to share your opinion, remember that public officials were put in place because of their own values and decision-making strategies. Understand where your representative is coming from and learn more about the issues they care about. Once you have that knowledge, you will be in a much better position to share how your interests may align with their goals and the goals of your community.

Become an Artist Activist

Once you have the knowledge you need, make your move. We talked a lot about being an artist activist in our From Rust Belt to Artist Belt 2 conference; here are some key strategies you can follow to be successful:

Start early

  • Start early; and if you can’t, do not let that discourage you from starting at all
  • Officials are sometimes the obstacles, so work on campaigns and become involved in the political process to help get the best ones elected
  • Familiarize yourself with the bureaucratic process

Bring the arts to them

  • Bring public officials into direct contact with the arts by inviting them to special events, adding them to your mailing lists and regular sending press releases to them
  • Counter misinformation and stereotypes of artists and the artistic community

Get a group together

  • Put together a coalition among peers to build consensus on which policy goals to prioritize
  • Reach out to everyone, even those who may not be known arts supporters; you never know what passion or connection they may harbor for the arts
  • Enlist the help of friends with additional connections and form strategic alliances

Refine your message

  • Make sure what you are asking is doable. Be united around a workable and well-thought-out plan. Use data to support your case or demonstrate economic benefits like job creation.
  • Strategically frame your cause to appeal to the broader community in order to get the attention of public officials. Communicate the benefits of your plan so they can understand and help you communicate its value.
  • Presenting your message may be even more important than the message itself. Tell moving and interesting stories to help you appeal to the human side (as opposed to the data-driven side) of officials.
  • Don’t be discouraged if you are not initially heard. Persevere and build a bigger voice by collaborating. As you build your movement, check to see if you are advocating for the same end goal as a larger group or sector. Use their size to help you win support for the cause.  You may have to give up a little control to achieve a mutual end result; however, a success after all your efforts will be worth it.

Build relationships

  • Establish relationships with key leaders like government administrators and elected officials before you need something
  • Ask good questions, especially those that help you figure out the official’s taste in the arts. What would motivate her to help? What end result he trying to achieve?
  • Ask for advice and referrals.  This will enable you to reach more people  and will add buy-in for your public official
  • Find common ground, make a connection and help your officials realize the win-win for you and their constituents


Arts Advocates

Arts Advocates

Helping inform public decisions is our role as citizens and is possible at every level. Advocacy may seem unrelated to your art, but policies are affecting us. Artists are in a unique position to communicate our public value creatively and inform community leaders throughout greater Cleveland about our needs and the impact our creative practices have on their communities.

This information is intended for both novice and expert. These articles and resources will arm you with the information you need no matter how deep you want to go with advocacy work.

Also, you’re not in it alone! Arts Cleveland is always here to field a question or find you resources to help you be successful. We offer on-site training for organizations’ staff and board, and we are happy to meet with individuals with questions or to help solidify ideas. There are also plenty of artists working in this arena and there is power in working together, rather than duplicating work. We can help get you connected.

What is Advocacy?

Advocacy is defined as any action that speaks in favor of, recommends, argues for a cause, supports or defends, or pleads on behalf of others. This fact sheet offers a look at how advocacy is defined and what kinds of activities comprise advocacy work.

How is advocacy different than lobbying?

Lobbying is only one kind of advocacy. Not all advocacy is lobbying but all lobbying is advocacy.

What kind of activities comprise advocacy work?

The following list of advocacy activities is not exhaustive.

  • Organizing: Build power at the base. Organizing constituents and organizations around a common advocacy message allows for mobilization during critical times.
  • Educate Public Officials: Provide information on issues. Offering fact sheets, research or other information on your issues will educate public officials on the critical issues facing the people you serve.
  • Regulatory efforts: Take action at the agencies. Work with regulatory agencies to change public policies in ways that positively impact the population your organization serves.
  • Public education: Educate the community on the issues. There are many ways to educate the general public on your issues.
  • Nonpartisan voter mobilization: Encourage citizens to vote. Engage in a campaign to register individuals to vote and encourage them to do so.
  • Educational conferences: Gather, network, share information, and plan for the future. Convene to discuss issues and strategies affecting your targeted community.
  • Lobbying: Advocate for or against specific legislation. All nonprofits are permitted to lobby. 501(c)(3) public charities can engage in a generous but limited amount of lobbying.

How can your organization get more involved in advocacy? 

  • Educate. Inform your organization about current policies and problems affecting your community.
  • Evaluate. Evaluate your organization’s mission and goals, and examine whether current programs involve advocacy as a means to address problems or grievances in the community. If not, how could advocacy play a larger role in your organization’s programs?
  • Collaborate. Work in coalitions with groups whose philosophy and goals resonate with yours. Together, pooling staff and resources, all parties involved in the coalition should be equipped to take on campaigns and work for change.

Public meetings provide an inside look at process and decision-making. By attending meetings, you are in a better position to become informed and to have a say in the outcome. Knowing the history of Cuyahoga County’s economic development efforts, we can see the impact of arts and culture in the success of our local economy and back it up with research. Through our presence at meetings, we can showcase the arts and culture sector’s commitment to serving as an essential vehicle for reaching the goals of our larger community and region.

Benefits of Attending a Public Meeting

  • Understand how systems and procedures work
  • Hear how decisions are being made
  • Recognize specific concerns of individual representatives
  • Gain information to make clearer arguments for your causes
  • Make informed decisions as you vote for candidates and issues

Recommended Meetings

Arts and Culture Roundtable

Hosted by Arts Cleveland, the Arts and Culture Roundtable meeting is one of the few events that bring leaders from the arts and culture community together. It is a place to hear about the current political environment, how it will impact our arts and culture sector and what we can do collectively to influence the outcome. As part of these roundtables we often host a speaker or panel of experts to discuss the current issues at hand.  These meetings provide an environment to interact with each other, to ask questions and to come up with the best solutions possible as a sector.

Cuyahoga Arts & Culture Board Meetings

Cuyahoga Arts & Culture (CAC) is the public subdivision responsible for distributing the tax dollars generated by the cigarette tax to arts and culture organizations. Since 2007, CAC has invested millions of dollars into local nonprofits. Their quarterly board meetings are open to the public and anyone interested may attend. During these meetings, CAC discusses changes to program guidelines, staff and board, funding strategies and more. In addition, CAC provides an annual Report to the Community each spring.

Cuyahoga County Council Meeting

The Cuyahoga County Council is responsible for making a number of community decisions that directly affect the arts and culture sector. For example they ratify CAC board appointments and authorize the process for renewal of public funding for arts and culture returning to the ballot. The 11-member body is elected by Cuyahoga County residents. If you have an issue you feel strongly about, be sure to contact the official in your district, and let them know how it will strengthen the region.

Civic Commons: Turning Talk into Action

Interested in more regular discussion? Take action at the Civic Commons. A project that started in 2010, Civic Commons’ mission is to build conversations and connections that have the power to become informed, productive, collective civic action. In 2013, Civic Commons joined forces with ideastream to strengthen their existing services and to “complement the local public radio and television content in a way that allows community members to not only consume information but to discuss it and turn it into action.”  Anyone can join, and getting started is easy and fun. Check out their threads on the arts to add to topics or create your own discussions.

Nonprofit organizations have a unique opportunity to address issues of voter participation. We can help close participation gaps and strengthen democracy.

Location

Nonprofits are often located in and serve communities with lower voter participation.

Staff

Most of us nonprofit professionals are extremely dedicated to improving our communities for the better. We have the ability to make positive change.

Trust

Nonprofits have the credibility and respect necessary to reach out to discouraged and disengaged voters. There is great opportunity to make the process less daunting and more meaningful for those who are new to voting and politics.

Impact

Nonprofit organizations reach populations missed by political campaigns. We are highly effective at increasing voter and civic participation when we actively engage people in the voting process.

What Are the Rules?

This webinar training session answers questions on what nonprofits can do to encourage voter participation through outreach and education to voters in their communities.

Educating Voters

Distribute Ballot Measure Guides

Ballot measures are about laws or constitutional amendments, not candidate elections. You may advocate for or against a ballot measure as a lobbying activity. You may also choose to distribute nonpartisan information on ballot measures as a nonpartisan voter education activity.

Take a position

  • † Sign onto a coalition or a public statement advocating a “yes” or “no” vote.
  • † Pass out materials to your constituents explaining why to vote “yes” or “no” on a ballot measure.
  • † Report advocacy expenditures, if any, as a lobbying activity subject to normal limits on lobbying.
  • † If your nonprofit lobbies, you should file the 501(h) Election with the IRS to standardize lobbying reporting on your 990, including a clear guideline for lobbying spending.

Distribute neutral voter guides on ballot measures that explain the measures but don’t take a position for or against passage.

  • Find a neutral ballot measure guide that discusses what happens if the measure does or doesn’t pass. You can often find nonpartisan ballot measure guides from the same sources that produce candidate guides.
  • Remember, nonpartisan voter guides are education, not lobbying. There are no financial or time restrictions on a 501(c)(3)’s nonpartisan ballot measure education activities.”

A Local Context

A chief example of how we’ve transformed our community through a local ballot issue can be seen within our own sector. In 2006, arts and culture projects, organizations and artists were supported with millions of dollars through the passage of Issue 18. This allowed for a 30-cent tax on each pack of cigarettes sold in Cuyahoga County to be dedicated to the support of arts and culture. Cuyahoga Arts & Culture, the public subdivision responsible for distributing the funds, has supported organizations that have significantly improved the lives of greater Cleveland residents and beyond.

Whether you consider your right to vote a unique opportunity or your social responsibility, please make your opinion count through your vote. It’s amazing such a small act can make such a difference.

All types of advocacy require campaigning and mobilizing support. Through various communication strategies you can easily share important messages and pique constituent interest. Advocacy essentially involves ‘influencing’ decision makers and thereby decision-making. By using current research and data you can build a case with the right message to support your work and the work of others. It’s important, however this data be interpreted and translated to fit your intended audience. This becomes even more critical when deciding the appropriate communication channel.

Below are a number of articles and research pieces to help you form message points and a communication strategy. Your overall strategy should align with your capacity and goals. Always keep your audience and desired outcome in mind.

Tools and Resources

  • Developing a message and your communication strategy can be a bit overwhelming at first. To start, consider using a framework to help you better define what might work best for you provided your capacity and your intended outcomes. This worksheet can help get you started, and this article from the Harvard Business Review can point you in the right direction.
  • With social media being one of the largest forms of communication today, these platforms can be powerful tools for sharing messages. Here are guides to using Facebook and Twitter during campaigns.
  • Thinking of running for office? Start here with some questions to ask yourself.

Integrated into your work, advocacy efforts should be simple, powerful and strategic. Most important, clarity around the outcome of these efforts is essential. Conversations with your colleagues,your board and/or your staff is a great starting point in determining where advocacy best fits for you. This dialogue might help you think through specific priorities and goals, how you might measure your impact and how to support that work through a more formalized structure.

The tips and tools below provide greater insight into building or reactivating your advocacy structure. Don’t hesitate to contact us if you need assistance in getting started!

Tools and Resources

Taking the time to build relationships with the policy makers in your community is an important step in creating change. We are here to provide you with the necessary tips and tools to set you up for success. The resources below will help you find your policy makers, provide advice on reaching out and establishing a meeting with them and give you a framework for the conversation. As always, we are here to support you every step of the way. Don’t hesitate to contact us and get counsel on your next steps.

Tools and Resources

As a 501(c)(3) organization, you can and should actively support campaigns you are passionate about by following some simple state and federal guidelines. Your organization and staff can work directly or indirectly with campaign organizers, events and fundraising efforts. We encourage you to contact your financial and legal counsel before you engage in campaign activity, and we hope these tools provide further insight for those conversations.

Tools and Resources


Liz Maugans

Liz Maugans

A community artist, curator of this campaign, and fellow neighbor.

Follow the artist

About the artist

Liz Maugans is the Director of YARDS Projects, and Curator of the Dalad Collection at Worthington Yards in Cleveland’s Warehouse District. She is co-founder of Art EverySpace and the Artist Bridge Coalition, former Executive Director of Zygote Press and founder of Collective Arts Network and the Artist Trust (The Cleveland Artist Registry). Maugans was instrumental in bringing the Rooms-to-Let Project to Slavic Village and acts as a consultant and participant of the temporary installations that take place in foreclosed houses. Maugans is on the Board of Trustees of the Collective Arts Network and teaches Artist-in-Communities as an adjunct at Cleveland State University. She has taught printmaking and drawing intermittently throughout the years at the Cleveland Institute of Art.  

For over twenty-five years, she has organized one-person and thematic exhibitions featuring regional, national and internationally known artists. Her curatorial specialization is her devotion to emerging art, social justice and local experimental practices that broaden access through social networks, inclusion and community-building initiatives. An advocate for artists and the visual arts, Maugans has served as a consultant for numerous community development organizations and creative business start-ups. Her passion for cross-disciplinary partnerships includes collaborations with the North Shore Federation of Labor, The AIDS Taskforce of Greater Cleveland, Community Assessment and Treatment Services, Gordon Square Arts District and the Support for Artist Planning Team through Cuyahoga Arts and Culture.  

She received her BFA in printmaking from Kent State University and her MFA from Cranbrook Academy of Art in 1992. Maugans’ work is included in the Progressive Art Collection, The Cleveland Clinic, the Dalad Collection, BF Goodrich, the Westin Collection and The Riffe Center for Government and the Arts.  She received an Ohio Arts Council Individual Artist Fellowship in 2000 and a 2005 Artist-in-Communities Grant. Maugans was awarded an Ohio Arts Council’s International Residency to Dresden, Germany in 2009. She was honored, along with her Zygote co-founder, Bellamy Printz, the Martha Joseph Prize for Distinguished Service from the Cleveland Arts Prize in 2012. In 2013, she was awarded a $20,000 Creative Workforce Fellowship from Community Partnership for Arts and Culture. 

Maugans lives in Bay Village with her husband, John and three kids, Olivia, John and Will. She is represented through HEDGE Gallery at 78th Street Studios

Two Cents for Arts & Culture

Commit 2% of the $500 million+ Cleveland is receiving in federal ARPA funds to Arts & Culture!

Covid has hit the creative sector hard.  An ARPA investment of $10 million helps protect and brings jobs to EVERY neighborhood.  We are creative businesses. We are cultural nonprofits. We are individual artists and so much more. We remain anchors for neighborhoods all over the city. ARPA funds will protect one of our greatest assets that is central to Cleveland’s economy and identity.

Artists for ARPA

Led by creative people, for creative people, we’ve created 18 unique and vibrant postcards, featuring artists of all disciplines in all 17 Cleveland City Wards. Take a look through the art below.

Right now, we have the opportunity to acquire more funding for our Creative Workers. Our city has received $511 million in American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funds, a pandemic support program enacted by President Biden. We need your help in asking Cleveland City Council to dedicate $10 million of these dollars to our Creative WorkforceThis is only 2% of the ARPA funds Cleveland received – that’s only 2 cents on the dollar!

Let’s flood City Hall with powerful postcard messages! Attend an ARPA Postcard Party on Feb 24 or March 3 and Tweet + Email your City Council Member today.

We’re making progress

Recently, Mayor Bibb included a recommendation in his transition report to allocate $10 million to arts and culture. This is an exciting step, but we must help Cleveland City Council understand why their vote in favor of this recommendation is a smart choice. Your voice matters.


Nathalie Bermudez

Nathalie Bermudez

An artist and fellow neighbor in Clark-Fulton, Stockyards and portions of Brooklyn Centre, and Tremont.

Follow the artist

Two Cents for Arts & Culture

Commit 2% of the $500 million+ Cleveland is receiving in federal ARPA funds to Arts & Culture!

Covid has hit the creative sector hard.  An ARPA investment of $10 million helps protect and brings jobs to EVERY neighborhood.  We are creative businesses. We are cultural nonprofits. We are individual artists and so much more. We remain anchors for neighborhoods all over the city. ARPA funds will protect one of our greatest assets that is central to Cleveland’s economy and identity.

Artists for ARPA

Led by creative people, for creative people, we’ve created 18 unique and vibrant postcards, featuring artists of all disciplines in all 17 Cleveland City Wards. Take a look through the art below.

Right now, we have the opportunity to acquire more funding for our Creative Workers. Our city has received $511 million in American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funds, a pandemic support program enacted by President Biden. We need your help in asking Cleveland City Council to dedicate $10 million of these dollars to our Creative WorkforceThis is only 2% of the ARPA funds Cleveland received – that’s only 2 cents on the dollar!

Let’s flood City Hall with powerful postcard messages! Attend an ARPA Postcard Party on Feb 24 or March 3 and Tweet + Email your City Council Member today.

We’re making progress

Recently, Mayor Bibb included a recommendation in his transition report to allocate $10 million to arts and culture. This is an exciting step, but we must help Cleveland City Council understand why their vote in favor of this recommendation is a smart choice. Your voice matters.

Assemble Now

Contact Jasmin Santana in Ward 14

Tweet Now

    Sincerely,

    *All fields are required

    Office Phone Number: 216.664.4238


    Attend a Postcard Party

    Happy Dog, Thursday, February 24, 4:30-6:30

    RSVP

    Sankofa Fine Arts, Thursday, March 3, 4:00-6:00

    RSVP

    Christa Ebert

    Christa Ebert

    An artist and fellow neighbor in Ward 17: West Park, Kamm's Corners, and Puritas

    About the artist

    Musician and mixed media artist Christa Ebert performs as Uno Lady, a one-woman choir, and composes songs with her voice, nature sounds, and electronic tools. Using her four-octave singing range, she constructs sonic worlds with dream-like vocal layers and looping ethereal tones. Also as a video artist, she creates nature inspired stop-motion music videos to accompany her compositions. Christa has recorded and produced six releases, including the most recent mindfulness album and film series, GROUNDED. Her unique talent has been acknowledged with various awards, including residencies and fellowships with Ellis-Beauregard Foundation, Foundation House, SPACE’s Urgent Art Fund, Chateau Orquevaux, Creative Workforce Fellow, Akron Soul Train, and  Panza Foundation.

    Follow the artist

    Two Cents for Arts & Culture

    Commit 2% of the $500 million+ Cleveland is receiving in federal ARPA funds to Arts & Culture!

    Covid has hit the creative sector hard.  An ARPA investment of $10 million helps protect and brings jobs to EVERY neighborhood.  We are creative businesses. We are cultural nonprofits. We are individual artists and so much more. We remain anchors for neighborhoods all over the city. ARPA funds will protect one of our greatest assets that is central to Cleveland’s economy and identity.

    Artists for ARPA

    Led by creative people, for creative people, we’ve created 18 unique and vibrant postcards, featuring artists of all disciplines in all 17 Cleveland City Wards. Take a look through the art below.

    Right now, we have the opportunity to acquire more funding for our Creative Workers. Our city has received $511 million in American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funds, a pandemic support program enacted by President Biden. We need your help in asking Cleveland City Council to dedicate $10 million of these dollars to our Creative WorkforceThis is only 2% of the ARPA funds Cleveland received – that’s only 2 cents on the dollar!

    Let’s flood City Hall with powerful postcard messages! Attend an ARPA Postcard Party on Feb 24 or March 3 and Tweet + Email your City Council Member today.

    We’re making progress

    Recently, Mayor Bibb included a recommendation in his transition report to allocate $10 million to arts and culture. This is an exciting step, but we must help Cleveland City Council understand why their vote in favor of this recommendation is a smart choice. Your voice matters.

    Assemble Now

    Contact your Council Member Charles J. Slife in Ward 17

    Tweet Now

      Sincerely,

      *All fields are required

      Office Phone Number: 216.664.4239


      Attend a Postcard Party

      Happy Dog, Thursday, February 24, 4:30-6:30

      RSVP

      Sankofa Fine Arts, Thursday, March 3, 4:00-6:00

      RSVP

      Beth Wood

      Beth Wood

      An artist and fellow neighbor in Ward 16: City of Lakewood border to City of Brook Park, Bellaire-Puritas, and West Park.

      Two Cents for Arts & Culture

      Commit 2% of the $500 million+ Cleveland is receiving in federal ARPA funds to Arts & Culture!

      Covid has hit the creative sector hard.  An ARPA investment of $10 million helps protect and brings jobs to EVERY neighborhood.  We are creative businesses. We are cultural nonprofits. We are individual artists and so much more. We remain anchors for neighborhoods all over the city. ARPA funds will protect one of our greatest assets that is central to Cleveland’s economy and identity.

      Artists for ARPA

      Led by creative people, for creative people, we’ve created 18 unique and vibrant postcards, featuring artists of all disciplines in all 17 Cleveland City Wards. Take a look through the art below.

      Right now, we have the opportunity to acquire more funding for our Creative Workers. Our city has received $511 million in American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funds, a pandemic support program enacted by President Biden. We need your help in asking Cleveland City Council to dedicate $10 million of these dollars to our Creative WorkforceThis is only 2% of the ARPA funds Cleveland received – that’s only 2 cents on the dollar!

      Let’s flood City Hall with powerful postcard messages! Attend an ARPA Postcard Party on Feb 24 or March 3 and Tweet + Email your City Council Member today.

      We’re making progress

      Recently, Mayor Bibb included a recommendation in his transition report to allocate $10 million to arts and culture. This is an exciting step, but we must help Cleveland City Council understand why their vote in favor of this recommendation is a smart choice. Your voice matters.

      Assemble Now

      Contact Council Member Brian Kazy in Ward 16

      Tweet Now

        Sincerely,

        *All fields are required

        Office Phone Number:216.664.2942


        Attend a Postcard Party

        Happy Dog, Thursday, February 24, 4:30-6:30

        RSVP

        Sankofa Fine Arts, Thursday, March 3, 4:00-6:00

        RSVP

        Kyle Kidd

        Kyle Kidd

        An artist and fellow neighbor in Ward 15: Edgewater, Cudell, Detroit Shoreway, and portions of Ohio City & Stockyards.

        About the artist

        Kyle creates Black Art, pulling from the many different avenues of black music and culture, vocally fusing classical, jazz, blues, gospel, funk and soul. They are currently performing throughout the country with artists such as Mourning a BLKstar, Algiers, and Richard Kennedy. Kyle also works as an educator in the Youth Sing Out program, collaborating with Roots of American Music, The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and The Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage. In their solo division, Kyle composes original music and curates multi-sensory experiences that incorporate stylized video, music, and fashion. They intend for their art in all its forms to be a tribal legacy, centered on representation, raw expression, and true freedom for each of us.

        Follow the artist

        Two Cents for Arts & Culture

        Commit 2% of the $500 million+ Cleveland is receiving in federal ARPA funds to Arts & Culture!

        Covid has hit the creative sector hard.  An ARPA investment of $10 million helps protect and brings jobs to EVERY neighborhood.  We are creative businesses. We are cultural nonprofits. We are individual artists and so much more. We remain anchors for neighborhoods all over the city. ARPA funds will protect one of our greatest assets that is central to Cleveland’s economy and identity.

        Artists for ARPA

        Led by creative people, for creative people, we’ve created 18 unique and vibrant postcards, featuring artists of all disciplines in all 17 Cleveland City Wards. Take a look through the art below.

        Right now, we have the opportunity to acquire more funding for our Creative Workers. Our city has received $511 million in American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funds, a pandemic support program enacted by President Biden. We need your help in asking Cleveland City Council to dedicate $10 million of these dollars to our Creative WorkforceThis is only 2% of the ARPA funds Cleveland received – that’s only 2 cents on the dollar!

        Let’s flood City Hall with powerful postcard messages! Attend an ARPA Postcard Party on Feb 24 or March 3 and Tweet + Email your City Council Member today.

        We’re making progress

        Recently, Mayor Bibb included a recommendation in his transition report to allocate $10 million to arts and culture. This is an exciting step, but we must help Cleveland City Council understand why their vote in favor of this recommendation is a smart choice. Your voice matters.

        Assemble Now

        Contact Council Member Jenny Spencer in Ward 15

        Tweet Now

          Sincerely,

          *All fields are required

          Office Phone Number: 216.664.4235


          Attend a Postcard Party

          Happy Dog, Thursday, February 24, 4:30-6:30

          RSVP

          Sankofa Fine Arts, Thursday, March 3, 4:00-6:00

          RSVP

          Kubra Abbas Alhilali

          Kubra Abbas Alhilali

          An artist and fellow neighbor in Ward 14: Clark-Fulton, Stockyards, portions of Brooklyn Centre and Tremont

          Follow the artist

          Two Cents for Arts & Culture

          Commit 2% of the $500 million+ Cleveland is receiving in federal ARPA funds to Arts & Culture!

          Covid has hit the creative sector hard.  An ARPA investment of $10 million helps protect and brings jobs to EVERY neighborhood.  We are creative businesses. We are cultural nonprofits. We are individual artists and so much more. We remain anchors for neighborhoods all over the city. ARPA funds will protect one of our greatest assets that is central to Cleveland’s economy and identity.

          Artists for ARPA

          Led by creative people, for creative people, we’ve created 18 unique and vibrant postcards, featuring artists of all disciplines in all 17 Cleveland City Wards. Take a look through the art below.

          Right now, we have the opportunity to acquire more funding for our Creative Workers. Our city has received $511 million in American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funds, a pandemic support program enacted by President Biden. We need your help in asking Cleveland City Council to dedicate $10 million of these dollars to our Creative WorkforceThis is only 2% of the ARPA funds Cleveland received – that’s only 2 cents on the dollar!

          Let’s flood City Hall with powerful postcard messages! Attend an ARPA Postcard Party on Feb 24 or March 3 and Tweet + Email your City Council Member today.

          We’re making progress

          Recently, Mayor Bibb included a recommendation in his transition report to allocate $10 million to arts and culture. This is an exciting step, but we must help Cleveland City Council understand why their vote in favor of this recommendation is a smart choice. Your voice matters.

          Assemble Now

          Contact Council Member Jasmin Santana in Ward 14

          Tweet Now

            Sincerely,

            *All fields are required

            Office Phone Number:  216.664.4238


            Attend a Postcard Party

            Happy Dog, Thursday, February 24, 4:30-6:30

            RSVP

            Sankofa Fine Arts, Thursday, March 3, 4:00-6:00

            RSVP

            Sean Mabin

            Sean Mabin

            An artist and fellow neighbor in Ward 13: Old Brooklyn, Stockyard.

            Follow the artist

            Two Cents for Arts & Culture

            Commit 2% of the $500 million+ Cleveland is receiving in federal ARPA funds to Arts & Culture!

            Covid has hit the creative sector hard.  An ARPA investment of $10 million helps protect and brings jobs to EVERY neighborhood.  We are creative businesses. We are cultural nonprofits. We are individual artists and so much more. We remain anchors for neighborhoods all over the city. ARPA funds will protect one of our greatest assets that is central to Cleveland’s economy and identity.

            Artists for ARPA

            Led by creative people, for creative people, we’ve created 18 unique and vibrant postcards, featuring artists of all disciplines in all 17 Cleveland City Wards. Take a look through the art below.

            Right now, we have the opportunity to acquire more funding for our Creative Workers. Our city has received $511 million in American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funds, a pandemic support program enacted by President Biden. We need your help in asking Cleveland City Council to dedicate $10 million of these dollars to our Creative WorkforceThis is only 2% of the ARPA funds Cleveland received – that’s only 2 cents on the dollar!

            Let’s flood City Hall with powerful postcard messages! Attend an ARPA Postcard Party on Feb 24 or March 3 and Tweet + Email your City Council Member today.

            We’re making progress

            Recently, Mayor Bibb included a recommendation in his transition report to allocate $10 million to arts and culture. This is an exciting step, but we must help Cleveland City Council understand why their vote in favor of this recommendation is a smart choice. Your voice matters.

            Assemble Now

            Contact Council Member Kris Harsh in Ward 13

            Tweet Now

              Sincerely,

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              Office Phone Number: 216.664.2943


              Attend a Postcard Party

              Happy Dog, Thursday, February 24, 4:30-6:30

              RSVP

              Sankofa Fine Arts, Thursday, March 3, 4:00-6:00

              RSVP