CAC Trustees Approve a Resolution Requesting November Tax Levy to Fund Cuyahoga Arts & Culture Through 2035

CAC Trustees Approve a Resolution Requesting November Tax Levy to Fund Cuyahoga Arts & Culture Through 2035

Replacement Levy Could Generate $160M Over 10 Years, Expand Public Investment in Hundreds of Nonprofit Arts Organizations

CLEVELAND (April 29, 2024) – Today, the Cuyahoga Arts & Culture Board of Trustees approved a resolution to Cuyahoga County Council requesting a tax levy be placed on the November 2024 ballot to replace and expand CAC’s dedicated tax resource.

The resolution, approved unanimously by CAC’s Trustees in a public meeting, formally requests that Cuyahoga County Council submit the question of the replacement levy to Cuyahoga County voters at the November 5, 2024 general election. Cuyahoga Arts & Culture’s sole revenue source is a tax on cigarettes sold in Cuyahoga County, Ohio. The tax would continue to provide public funding for the operations of Cuyahoga County’s arts and cultural nonprofits.

Read CAC's Full Press Release

ASSEMBLY FOR THE ARTS LAUNCHES APPLICATIONS FOR TWO ARTIST SUPPORT PROGRAMS

CLEVELAND, April 9, 2024  — Applications for two major artist funding programs under Assembly for the Arts will open this month. The application for the Creative Impact Fund is now open, and applications for the Rapid Action Grant will open on Tuesday, April 30.

The two programs are made possible by the residents of Cuyahoga County through a public grant from Cuyahoga Arts & Culture and will provide flexible (unrestricted) funding and project grants to about 40 artists across Cuyahoga County. Both grant programs are open to artists of all disciplines.

Program Program Overview Eligible Disciplines # of Artist Awards $ per Artist Award Application Period
Creative Impact Fund Unrestricted funds Open to all creative disciplines 17 $10,000 Friday, April 5 to Friday, May 31, 2024
Rapid Action Grant Project-based funds Open to all creative disciplines 10-20 $500 to $2,000 April 30 to December, 2024 (or until funds are distributed)

 

The 2024 Creative Impact Fund has been redesigned from its inaugural 2023 version, and the changes are a direct result of a community engagement initiative that Assembly completed in 2023. This included hosting a series of discussions and a survey to hear directly from artists about their funding needs. The goal of this year’s Creative Impact Fund is to encourage the growth of artists’ creative practice and advance their impact on the region. Open to individual Cuyahoga County-based artists of all creative disciplines, 17 artists will each be awarded $10,000 in unrestricted funds (sometimes called flexible funds). In addition, they will receive professional and business development opportunities, mentorship and networking opportunities, and an Assembly for the Arts membership. Applications are due May 31, 2024.

Rapid Action Grants will range from $500 to $2,000. The goal of the Rapid Action Grant is to provide easy to access funds for Cuyahoga County-based artists. Artists and creatives may request up to $2,000 to support their arts-centered public projects, events or needs that are specific to their creative practice. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis until $14,000 in funds have been distributed.

Deidre McPherson, Chief Community Officer of Assembly for the Arts, stressed that artists of all disciplines and in all corners of Cuyahoga County should apply for these funds. “Assembly for the Arts wants these grant programs to help a variety of creatives across Greater Cleveland. We have worked to make the application process as simple as possible, and our team is available to help any artist who needs assistance completing the application,” McPherson said. ”We’re asking all of our community partners to spread the word so we can reach as many artists as possible.”

Creative Impact Fund Information Sessions

Assembly will host a series of in-person and virtual information sessions for interested applicants to learn about the CIF application processes.

  • Thursday, April 11 (6:00-7:00 pm)
    B-Side at the Grog Shop: 2785 Euclid Heights Blvd., Cleveland Heights, OH 44106
  • Thursday, April 18 (12:00-1:00 pm)
    Virtual Session via Zoom
    The virtual session will be recorded and posted to Assembly’s website at https://assemblycle.org/cifprogram2024/.
  • Wednesday, May 8 (6:00-7:00 pm)
    Cuyahoga County Public Library, Warrensville Heights Branch: 4415 Northfield Road, Warrensville Heights, OH 44128
  • Wednesday, May 22 (6:00-7:00 pm)
    LGBT Community Center of Greater Cleveland: 6705 Detroit Ave., Cleveland, OH 44102

Learn more about the Creative Impact Fund and register to attend an upcoming information session at https://assemblycle.org/cifprogram2024/. Details about the Rapid Action Grant and other funding opportunities for individual artists and creatives is available at https://assemblycle.org/artistfunding/.

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Assembly for the Arts is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization with a focus on advocacy, cultural policy, racial equity initiatives, research, marketing that elevates the region, and services for nonprofits, artists, and creative businesses. It is governed by a volunteer board with a strong commitment to diversity and inclusion. Assembly by design operates in close partnership with Cuyahoga Arts & Culture, a government agency, and Assembly for Action, a 501(c)4 political action nonprofit to serve the entire creative sector. Assembly is supported through major funding from: The Cleveland Foundation, The George Gund Foundation, The Char and Chuck Fowler Family Foundation, Cuyahoga Arts & Culture, Ohio Arts Council, Huntington, KeyBank, The George W. Codrington Charitable Foundation, and Fred & Laura Ruth Bidwell. www.assemblycle.org

MEDIA CONTACT:

Malissa Bodmann

malissa@compellingcommunicationsllc.com

216-536-7517


ASSEMBLY FOR THE ARTS TO SUPPORT DOZENS OF CREATIVES WITH $500,000 GRANT FROM CUYAHOGA ARTS & CULTURE

CLEVELAND, March 7, 2024 — Assembly for the Arts has announced the details of its 2024 artist support programs, funded by a $500,000 grant from Cuyahoga Arts & Culture. The programs will provide unrestricted funds and project grants to between 66 and 78 artists. Awardees will benefit from professional development, institutional connections, access to dedicated workspace, performance and exhibition opportunities and more. 

Assembly will disseminate the awards directly and via partnerships with Cleveland Public Theatre, Julia de Burgos Cultural Arts Center, Karamu House, and SPACES. Cleveland Public Theatre, Karamu House and SPACES will use additional outside funds to expand their programs. 

Assembly and the partners designed the 2024 programs in response to the creative community, which advocated for: 

  • Prioritizing unrestricted funds and increasing the award amounts for individual artists 
  • Simplifying and streamlining grant application processes to reduce administrative burdens 
  • Encouraging applicants from historically underrepresented or marginalized artists 
  • Creating a central virtual space to find grant opportunities, deadlines, and resources 

Jeremy V. Johnson, president and CEO of Assembly for the Arts, said the 2024 Support for Artist program reflects feedback from artist surveys and listening sessions. “We took to heart the concerns of creatives. We made the application process easier, expanded unrestricted funds, and broadened the reach to more disciplines,” he said. ”We are ensuring our outreach efforts include increasing awareness of these opportunities to artists of all creative disciplines.” 

The 2024 programs are as follows: 

For full details about these programs, please visit https://assemblycle.org/artistfunding/ 

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Assembly for the Arts is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization with a focus on advocacy, cultural policy, racial equity initiatives, research, marketing that elevates the region, and services for nonprofits, artists, and creative businesses. It is governed by a volunteer board with a strong commitment to diversity and inclusion. Assembly by design operates in close partnership with Cuyahoga Arts & Culture, a government agency, and Assembly for Action, a 501(c)4 political action nonprofit to serve the entire creative sector. Assembly is supported through major funding from: The Cleveland Foundation, The George Gund Foundation, The Char and Chuck Fowler Family Foundation, Cuyahoga Arts & Culture, Ohio Arts Council, Huntington, KeyBank, The George W. Codrington Charitable Foundation, and Fred & Laura Ruth Bidwell. www.assemblycle.org

MEDIA CONTACT:

Malissa Bodmann
malissa@compellingcommunicationsllc.com
216-536-7517


Bibb Administration Launches Transformative Arts Fund, Nearly $3 Million in Grants Now Available to Local Artists

Source: Clevelandohio.gov

Date: Wednesday, Jan 31, 2024

Abstract:

Between 6 to 12 Cleveland-Centric Projects Will Receive Awards Ranging from $250,000 to $500,000

Wednesday, January 31, 2024 — Cleveland — Mayor Justin M. Bibb announced nearly $3 million is now available for local artists through the City’s Transformative Arts Fund (TAF) grant program.  The program will provide funding for projects and initiatives led by Cleveland-based artists.  The application portal opened today and those who are interested have until 11:59 p.m. on Saturday, March 30 to apply.

“Our local creative community provides the heartbeat that keeps our neighborhoods vibrant and alive – they inspire our children, bring difficult societal challenges to light, and empower us to take action,” said Mayor Bibb.  “This transformative-level of funding we will be providing is designed to award artists who propose projects that will have a sustained, positive impact in the community long after they are completed.”

The TAF is dedicated to empower artists, creators, and communities to collaborate and create art that reflects the diversity and richness of Cleveland.  Grant amounts will range from $250,000 to $500,000 – meaning that at least 6 and up to 12 projects will be awarded.  The application must be completed by the lead artist(s), with a commitment from a partnering institution who will provide organizational support and administrative assistance for the project.  As a Cleveland-centric program, the following criteria must be met in order to be eligible to receive an award:

·  The lead artist must be 18+ years old and live in the City of Cleveland
·  The partnering institution must be located in the City of Cleveland
·  The proposed project must be based in the City of Cleveland

Artists across the various types of creative disciplines – painting, music, film, culinary, fashion, and others – are all encouraged to apply.  Applicants can collaborate with any institutional partner – which could include community development corporations, social service agencies, nonprofits, schools, religious groups, or private businesses.  Special consideration will be given to project proposals that amplify/address vacant land reutilization, the environment, food insecurity, violence prevention, safe spaces in the city, social determinants of health, and matters of diversity, equity, and inclusion.  Applicants will be required to provide work samples, a detailed budget, an institutional partner letter of commitment, and other documentation when submitting the application.

“Arts is all about nurturing creativity, and innovation while providing entertainment outlets for people of all ages.  As a child, I played instruments for hours after school.  This sparked a creative fire in me and kept me out of trouble,” stated Councilman Kevin Conwell.  The arts are a catalyst for innovation, pushing boundaries, and challenging the status quo.  This is a big deal for Cleveland.  It’s cool beans that we were able to get this up!”

Those who are interested in learning more about the eligibility requirements, necessary documentation, application process, and overall program can find additional information on the TAF webpage.


CLEVELAND-ELYRIA RANKED 12th AMONG 20 MOST ARTS-VIBRANT LARGE COMMUNITIES IN THE NATION

The 8th Annual Arts Vibrancy Index from SMU DataArts Compiles List of 40 Most Vibrant Arts Communities Across the U.S., Based on Measures of Per Capita Supply, Demand and Government Support for the Arts

CLEVELAND, OH, November 13, 2023 – SMU DataArts, the National Center for Arts Research, released its 8th Arts Vibrancy Index, which identifies Cleveland-Elyria as number 12 in the list of 20 large communities in the United States through an analysis of the level of supply, demand, and government support for the arts in more than 900 communities across the country. Organized into three separate lists based on community population size, totaling 40 communities across the country, this year’s Arts Vibrancy Index is the first to include numerical rankings since 2020, a reflection of arts organizations returning to in-person activities and performances following the easing of pandemic restrictions. Cleveland, along with neighboring Elyria, has consistently appeared on the Arts Vibrancy Index since its debut on the rankings in 2018. 

This year, Cleveland is ranked 12th on the annual list of large communities in the nation -- the highest ranking it has ever achieved.     

Related research by SMU DataArts shows that Local Arts Agencies (LAAs) like Assembly for the Arts and Cuyahoga Arts & Culture are powerful catalysts of arts vibrancy which ensure that the arts remain an integral part of community life. Fluctuations in a community’s ranking occur from year to year for a variety of reasons, including the opening of an arts district or closing of a performance space as well as local economic conditions. 

Cuyahoga Arts & Culture (CAC) is the region’s largest funder for arts and culture. Since 2006, CAC has invested $230 million in over 470 organizations, including SMU Data Arts, to gather and share local nonprofit arts data through CAC’s grant application process.

“It’s important to have data to demonstrate the strength of Cuyahoga County’s creative community,” said Jill M. Paulsen, executive director of Cuyahoga Arts & Culture. “Each year, CAC-funded organizations contribute information to SMU DataArts to help us tell the story of the sector’s impact and shine a light on their work.”

Jeremy V. Johnson, CEO and president of Assembly for the Arts, said, “Cleveland is now ranked 12th in the nation in terms of Arts Providers, Arts Dollars, and Government Support, joining the company of arts-heavy cities such as New York City, San Francisco, Washington, D.C., and Philadelphia. The Arts Vibrancy Index demonstrates the arts’ enduring importance, resiliency, and vibrancy in Greater Cleveland, which is why it’s essential to maintain public support for this important part of our economy.”

Arts-vibrant communities can be found in every region of the United States—a finding which arises from an objective analysis of the data, and not from selecting communities by hand to achieve geographic representation.

“The arts and culture sector was hit hard by the pandemic, and some organizations and communities are still recovering. The Index is an opportunity for communities to affirm and celebrate the individuals and organizations that are the sources of arts vibrancy in their region, whether that’s artists who have mastered a local craft tradition over generations, a cultural festival that families enjoy year after year, or a cherished historic theater, museum, or arts-education center. For organizations, funders, local citizens, and public officials, the Arts Vibrancy Index is a powerful resource that leverages data-driven evidence to illuminate how the arts contribute to an area’s economy and public life,” stated Dr. Zannie Voss, Director of SMU DataArts. “One way that public leaders can spark arts vibrancy in their communities is by expanding funding for local arts agencies, which spurs arts employment, stimulates more artistic activity, and increases the strength of geographically dispersed arts-vibrant cultural resources throughout communities.”

The Lists

In addition to the top arts-vibrant communities listed in the Arts Vibrancy Index, arts-vibrancy scores for every county in the United States can be viewed on an interactive map that identifies arts and cultural strengths that are present in every community. (Also known as Metropolitan or Micropolitan Statistical Areas, these communities have boundaries that are defined by the United States Census Bureau.)

Large Communities (population: 1 million +)

On the list of the most arts-vibrant communities with populations of 1 million or more, one city is new to the list: Milwaukee-Waukesha, WI. San Francisco-San Mateo-Redwood City, CA, sits at the top of the list for the first time since 2018 and Philadelphia, PA, has moved into the top 5 for the first time ever. After debuting in the 20th spot in 2020, Cincinnati, OH-KY-IN, has skyrocketed to the 11th spot.

  1. San Francisco-San Mateo-Redwood City, CA
  2. New York-Jersey City-White Plains, NY-NJ
  3. Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV
  4. Boston, MA
  5. Philadelphia, PA
  6. Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI
  7. Frederick-Gaithersburg-Rockville, MD
  8. Nashville-Davidson-Murfreesboro-Franklin, TN
  9. Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, CA
  10. New Orleans-Metairie, LA
  11. Cincinnati, OH-KY-IN
  12. Cleveland-Elyria, OH
  13. Cambridge-Newton-Framingham, MA
  14. Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, CO
  15. Pittsburgh, PA
  16. Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, OR-WA
  17. Seattle-Bellevue-Kent, WA
  18. Milwaukee-Waukesha, WI
  19. Chicago-Naperville-Evanston, IL
  20. St. Louis, MO-IL

 

Medium Communities (population: 100,000 – 1 million)

Medium communities are home to populations ranging from 100,000 to 1 million people. Canton-Massillon, OH, is new to this list, while Santa Fe, NM; San Rafael, CA; and Pittsfield, MA, have appeared on the list of top medium communities every year since 2015. Ann Arbor and Kalamazoo-Portage, MI, are returning to this list following their 2022 debuts. 

  1. Pittsfield, MA
  2. Santa Fe, NM
  3. Ithaca, NY
  4. San Rafael, CA
  5. Kalamazoo-Portage, MI
  6. Boulder, CO
  7. Missoula, MT
  8. Canton-Massillon, OH
  9. Burlington-South Burlington, VT
  10. Ann Arbor, MI

Small Communities (population <100,000)

Small communities are defined as areas with populations under 100,000. Jackson, WY-ID, and Bennington, VT, have made the list of small communities every year since 2015, with Jackson maintaining its ranking as first among small communities for the past four years.

  1. Jackson, WY-ID
  2. Brevard, NC
  3. Steamboat Springs, CO
  4. Bennington, VT
  5. Easton, MD
  6. Glenwood Springs, CO
  7. Hailey, ID
  8. Juneau, AK
  9. Brookings, SD
  10. Oneonta, NY

The overall Arts Vibrancy Index is composed of 13 unique measures which cover aspects of supply, demand, and public support for arts and culture, and are adjusted for cost of living and population differences among communities. In this year’s index, the analysis approach was updated to weight the 13 inputs based on their relative explanatory power for the underlying concept of arts vibrancy. This approach improves measurement consistency in the face of data availability delays or other changes in individual datasets from year to year. All financial metrics have been adjusted for cost of living in order to level the playing field. The cost of doing business varies based on local conditions, so the same dollar goes further in some communities than others.

ABOUT ASSEMBLY FOR THE ARTS

Assembly for the Arts is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization with a focus on advocacy, cultural policy, racial equity initiatives, research, marketing that elevates the region, and services for nonprofits, artists, and creative businesses. It is governed by a volunteer board with a strong commitment to diversity and inclusion. Assembly by design operates in close partnership with Cuyahoga Arts & Culture, a government agency, and Assembly for Action, a 501(c)4 political action nonprofit to serve the entire creative sector. Assembly is supported through major funding from: The Cleveland Foundation, The George Gund Foundation, The Char and Chuck Fowler Family Foundation, Cuyahoga Arts & Culture, Ohio Arts Council, Huntington, KeyBank, The George W. Codrington Charitable Foundation, and Fred & Laura Ruth Bidwell. www.assemblycle.org

ABOUT CUYAHOGA ARTS & CULTURE

Cuyahoga Arts & Culture (CAC) is the region’s largest funder for arts and culture, helping hundreds of organizations in Cuyahoga County connect millions of people to cultural experiences each year. Since 2006, CAC has invested $230 million in over 470 organizations, making our community a more vibrant place to live, work and play. CAC is a separate government entity and a political subdivision of the State of Ohio. For more information, visit cacgrants.org.

ABOUT SMU DATAARTS

SMU DataArts, the National Center for Arts Research, is a project of the Meadows School of the Arts at Southern Methodist University. The mission of SMU DataArts is to provide and engage both organizations and individuals with the evidence-based insights needed to collectively build strong, vibrant, and equitable arts communities. Its research efforts range from academic papers published in leading journals, applied research undertaken with community partners, and actionable insights shared directly with arts practitioners. Its programs provide business intelligence tools and resources to help arts leaders leverage data to answer critical management questions and connect research analyses to their own work. Recent publications include research reports on emergence from the COVID-19 crisis; the alchemy that drives high performing arts organizations of color; audience diversity, equity and inclusion in large performing arts organizations; impact of investments made in diverse creative communities; and more. 

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Media Contacts:

Malissa Bodmann

216-536-7517


Groundbreaking Study Reveals Economic and Social Impact of $533-Million Nonprofit Arts and Culture Sector in Cuyahoga County

Arts & Economic Prosperity 6 Study Centers Equity in Economic Research and Highlights Vital Role of Arts and Culture in Building More Livable Communities

CLEVELAND, Oct. 12, 2023 — Assembly for the Arts today announced that Cuyahoga County’s nonprofit arts and culture industry generated $533,156,171 in economic activity in 2022, according to the newly released Arts & Economic Prosperity 6 (AEP6), an economic and social impact study conducted by Americans for the Arts. That economic activity — $389.8 million in spending by nonprofit arts and culture organizations and an additional $143.3 million in event-related spending by their audiences — supported 8,637 jobs and generated $104.2 million in local, state, and federal government revenue. Spending by arts and culture audiences generates valuable commerce to local merchants, a value-add that few other industries can compete with.

Building on its 30-year legacy as the largest and most inclusive study of its kind, AEP6 uses a rigorous methodology to document the economic and social contributions of the nation’s nonprofit arts and culture industry. In Cuyahoga County, more than 1,000 audience members participated in the survey and 172 nonprofit organizations supplied financial and audience information – about 35% of nonprofit arts and culture organizations in the county. The study also surveyed audiences of color for the first time ever.

“The results of this study affirm what many of us in the arts community already knew: the nonprofit arts and culture sector is an important economic contributor in Cuyahoga County. More than that, a vibrant arts and culture community keeps residents engaged in their communities and brings people from outside the area to experience the world-class cultural experiences we are so fortunate to have here,” said Jeremy V. Johnson, president and CEO of Assembly for the Arts, which coordinated the study in Cuyahoga County.  “We can confidently say the nonprofit arts and culture sector’s economic impact is much greater than this survey reports considering just 35% of Cuyahoga County arts nonprofits participated in this voluntary survey.”

Nationally and locally, the extensive research reveals proportional economic and community impacts among attendees at BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, People of Color) and ALAANA (African, Latinx, Asian, Arab, Native American) organizations to the overall national average.

Chinenye Nkemere, chair of Assembly for the Arts’ Board of Trustees, said it's important that this study now includes communities of color in the data collection. “Cuyahoga County has a rich history of supporting BIPOC and ALAANA culture through the arts. It’s vital that national surveys like AEP6 collect data to a broad spectrum of audience members. These performances are critical to celebrating and highlighting the creative expertise of communities of color — and moreover, that audiences and organizations of color are essential economic contributors of our local economy,” Nkemere said.

Key figures from Cuyahoga County’s AEP6 study include:

  • Cuyahoga County’s arts and culture industry generates $143.3 million in event-related spending by its audiences.
  • 19.9% of arts and culture attendees were from outside the county in which the activity took place. Their spending is vital income for local merchants.
  • 88.4% of respondents agreed that the activity or venue they were attending was “a source of neighborhood pride for the community.”
  • 86.2% said they would “feel a sense of loss if that activity or venue was no longer available.”

Cuyahoga County Executive Chris Ronayne applauded Cuyahoga County’s participation in the survey. “Our arts and culture scene is a big part of what makes Cuyahoga County a vibrant place to live and to visit. This survey demonstrates how important it is to residents that we have world-class institutions, smaller arts groups and everything in between. There’s no doubt that when we support the arts, we are investing in Cuyahoga County’s economic and community well-being,” Ronayne said.

Rhonda K. Brown, Senior Strategist Arts, Culture & Creative Economy for the City of Cleveland, said she is excited about the findings. “The results of this survey affirm that when we talk about how to stimulate economic development in Cleveland, arts and culture must be at the table because of the sheer impact they have on our local economy. It’s equally important to acknowledge the role arts and culture play in fostering community pride all around the city of Cleveland,” Brown said.

Nationally, the Arts & Economic Prosperity 6 (AEP6) study reveals that America’s nonprofit arts and culture sector is a $151.7 billion industry—one that supports 2.6 million jobs and generates $29.1 billion in government revenue.

“Arts and culture organizations have a powerful ability to attract and hold dollars in the community longer. They employ people locally, purchase goods and services from nearby businesses, and produce the authentic cultural experiences that are magnets for visitors, tourists, and new residents,” said Nolen V. Bivens, president and CEO of Americans for the Arts. “When we invest in nonprofit arts and culture, we strengthen our economy and build more livable communities.”

The Participating Arts and Culture Attendees

1,011 people completed the AEP6 audience-intercept survey while attending a performance, event, or exhibit — or otherwise visiting a cultural event or facility —in Cuyahoga County during the period from May 2022 through June 2023. Assembly for the Arts extends its thanks to the following local partner organizations that promoted and allowed Assembly for the Arts to conduct the audience intercept surveying at their events/venues:

Beck Center for the Arts; CAN Journal; Cleveland Institute of Art; Cleveland Institute of Music; Cleveland Museum of Art; Cleveland Play House; Cleveland Public Theatre; Dance Cleveland; Dancing Wheels; Djapo Cultural Arts Institute; Dobama Theatre; Future Ink Graphics (FIG); Great Lakes African American Writer’s Conference; Greater Cleveland Urban Film Festival (GCUFF); Julia De Burgos Cultural Arts Center; Kaiser Gallery; Karamu House; Les Delices; Museum of Contemporary Art Cleveland (moCa); Museum of Creative Human Art (MOCHA); Musical Theatre Project; Near West Theatre; Oh Sew Powerful; RidAll Green Partnership; The Cleveland International Film Festival; The Cleveland Orchestra; The International Women’s Air and Space Museum; The Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage; Rock & Roll Hall of Fame; ThirdSpace Action Lab; Twelve Literary Arts; Western Reserve Historical Society.

The Participating Nonprofit Arts and Culture Organizations

This study could not have been completed without the cooperation and participation of the 172 nonprofit arts and culture organizations in Cuyahoga County, listed below, that provided the financial and attendance information necessary for the analysis.

A-C

Academy for Dramatic Arts; America Asian Pacific Islander Organization; America Scores Cleveland; Apollos Fire the Cleveland Baroque Orchestra; Art House; Art Therapy Studio; Artful Ohio; Artists Archives of the Western Reserve; Arts Impact; Assembly for the Arts; Association of African American Cultural Gardens; Association of Concert Bands; Baldwin Wallace University Conservatory of Music; Bay Village Community Band; Bay Village Historical Society; Bayarts; Beck Center for the Arts; Blue Water Chamber Orchestra; Borderlight Festival; Brite Winter Cleveland; Broadway School of Music & the Arts; Brook Park Library Friends; Cain Park (City of Cleveland Heights); Cassidy Theatre; Cavani String Quartet; Center for Arts-Inspired Learning; Chagrin Arts; Chagrin Documentary Film Festival; Chagrin Valley Little Theatre; Chamberfest Cleveland; Children’s Museum of Cleveland; Choral Arts Society of Cleveland; Cis Music Boosters; City Ballet of Cleveland; Citymusic Cleveland; Cleveland Architecture Foundation; Cleveland Art Association; Cleveland Arts Prize; Cleveland Ballet; Cleveland Botanical Garden; Cleveland Cello Society; Cleveland Chamber Choir; Cleveland Chamber Music Society; Cleveland Classical Guitar Society; Cleveland Comedy Festival; Cleveland Cultural Gardens Federation; Cleveland Dance Project Company; Cleveland Institute of Art; Cleveland Institute of Music; Cleveland International Film Festival ; Cleveland Jazz Orchestra; Cleveland Museum Of Art; Cleveland Museum of Natural History; The Cleveland Orchestra; Cleveland Opera; Cleveland Photographic Workshop; Cleveland Play House; Cleveland Pops Orchestra; Cleveland Print Room; Cleveland Public Theatre; Cleveland Restoration Society; Cleveland Rocks Past Present and Future; Cleveland School of Dance; Cleveland School of the Arts; Cleveland State University Art Gallery; Cleveland Uncommon Sound Project; Collective Arts Network; Convergence-Continuum; Cuyahoga Community College Jazzfest

D-F

DANCEcleveland; Dancing Wheels Company & School; Djapo Cultural Arts Institute; Dobama Theatre; Donauschwabens German American Cultural Center; Downtown Cleveland Alliance; Dunham Tavern Museum; Encore Chamber Music Institute; Ensemble Theater; Foluke Cultural Arts Center; Foundry Project Arts Incubator; Friends of the Beachwood Library; Friends of the Berea Library; Friends of the Chagrin Falls Library; Friends of The Cleveland Orchestra; Friends of The Mayfield Library; Friends of The Olmsted Falls Library; Friends of the Solon Library; Friends of the South Euclid-Lyndhurst Library; Friends of the Southeast (Bedford) Library; Friends of the Strongsville Library; Front Exhibition Company; Future Ink Graphics (FIG)

G-I

Graffiti Heart Corporation; Great Lakes African American Writers Conference; Great Lakes Science Center; Great Lakes Theater Festival; Greater Cleveland Urban Film Festival; Groundworks Dancetheater; Heights Arts Collaborative; Historical Society of Old Brooklyn; Ideastream; Ingenuity Cleveland; Inlet Dance Theatre; Institutional Community Development Corporation; Intermuseum Conservation Association

J-L

Jewish Federation of Cleveland; Julia De Burgos Cultural Arts Center; Karamu House; Kings & Queens of Art; Kulture Kids; Lake Erie Ink: A Writing Space For Youth; Lake Erie Nature & Science Center; Land Studio; Latinus Theater Company; Les Delices; LGBT Legacy Project; Literary Cleveland; Local 4 Music Fund

M-O

Maelstrom Collaborative Arts; Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage; Mandel Jewish Community Center Arts and Culture Program; Morgan Art of Papermaking Conservatory & Educational Foundation; Morrisondance; Murphy Irish Arts Center; Museum of Contemporary Art Cleveland; Musical Upcoming Stars in the Classics; Naach Di Cleveland; Nature Center at Shaker Lakes; Near West Theatre; North Coast Men's Chorus; Northern Ohio Children's Performing Music Foundation; Oh Sew Powerful; Open Doors

P-R

Parma Symphony Orchestra; Piano International Association of Northern Ohio; Playhouse Square Foundation; Praxis Integrated Fiber Workshop; Quire Cleveland; Radio on the Lake Theatre; Rainey Institute; Refresh Collective; Renovare Music; Restore Cleveland Hope; Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum; Rocky River Chamber Music Society; Roots of American Music

S-U

Sculpture Center; Shaker Heights Interest Group; Shaker Historical Society; Solon Community Band; Spaces; Talespinner Childrens Theatre; The Brecksville Theatre; The Children's Museum Of Cleveland; The City Club of Cleveland; The Cleveland Orchestra; The Cleveland Winds (The Cleveland Wind Symphony); The Contemporary Youth Orchestra; The Italian American Museum of Cleveland; The Music Settlement; The Musical Theater Project; Ukrainian Museum-Archives; United Cerebral Palsy of Greater Cleveland (Arts Programming); University Circle (UCI) Arts & Culture Program

V-Z

Valley Art Center; Verb Ballets; Wagner Museum of Art; Wake Up and Lives Actors Studio; Waterloo Arts; Western Reserve Chorale; Western Reserve Historical Society; Westlake Historical Society; Zygote Press

The full report, a map of the 373 study regions, and a two-page economic impact summary for each, can be found at AEP6.AmericansForTheArts.org. Cuyahoga County’s report can be downloaded at assemblycle.org/aep6.

For more information,  follow @Americans4Arts

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Assembly for the Arts is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization with a focus on advocacy, cultural policy, racial equity initiatives, research, marketing that elevates the region, and services for nonprofits, artists, and creative businesses. It is governed by a volunteer board with a strong commitment to diversity and inclusion. Assembly by design operates in close partnership with Cuyahoga Arts & Culture, a government agency, and Assembly for Action, a 501(c)4 political action nonprofit to serve the entire creative sector. Assembly is supported through major funding from: The Cleveland Foundation, The George Gund Foundation, The Char and Chuck Fowler Family Foundation, Cuyahoga Arts & Culture, Ohio Arts Council, Huntington, KeyBank, The George W. Codrington Charitable Foundation, and Fred & Laura Beth Bidwell. www.assemblycle.org

The Arts & Economic Prosperity 6 study was conducted by Americans for the Arts, the nation's leading nonprofit organization for advancing the arts and arts education. It was supported by The Ruth Lilly Endowment Fund of Americans for the Arts. Americans for the Arts' 297 study partners contributed both time and financial support to the study. For a full list of the communities who participated in the Arts & Economic Prosperity 6 study, visit AEP6.AmericansForTheArts.org.

MEDIA CONTACT:

Malissa Bodmann
malissa@compellingcommunicationsllc.com
216-536-7517


ASSEMBLY FOR THE ARTS BOARD ELECTS NEW LEADERSHIP

All-female slate of officers will lead the arts council board during critical time to secure additional public funding for the arts 

CLEVELAND, OHIO — Assembly for the Arts’ Trustees have elected a new slate of all-female officers to lead the nonprofit regional arts council for greater Cleveland. Their work will be instrumental in generating more resources and elevating equity for arts and culture in Cuyahoga County and beyond.  

Chinenye is a strategic thinker. She has over 10 years of experience in asset building, community engagement and education advocacy. She holds a B.A. in Political Science, African Studies and African American Studies from The Ohio State University, with a focus on race and electoral politics.  

ChiChi is a proud Teach for America-Houston alumna, teaching middle school American History, Texas History and English. She gained essential skills in community development and wraparound services for Black and Latino students and families. 

She is focused on creating large-scale systems change predicated on radically inclusive racial and gender equity. As such, she co-founded Enlightened Solutions, a social advocacy research think tank focused on the lived experiences of Black Women. 

ChiChi is the current Board Chair for The Assembly for the Arts, the VP of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion for the Junior League of Cleveland and board member of Preterm Cleveland and member of the NAACP of Greater Cleveland. She also served as a member of Mayor Justin Bibb's Transition Team (Equity in Action).

The new officers elected at a recent meeting of the Board of Trustees are:  

  • Chinenye (ChiChi) Nkemere, Enlightened Solutions - Chair 
  • Carrie Carpenter, Huntington National Bank - Vice Chair 
  • Shanelle Smith Whigham, KeyBank - Vice Chair 
  • Kelly Falcone-Hall, Western Reserve Historical Society - Secretary 
  • Sandra Madison, Robert P. Madison International Inc. - Treasurer 

Kathy Blackman from The Grog Shop has also joined Assembly’s board. 

 “Assembly was founded two years ago with a mission to increase equity in the arts, and our board has always been purposefully diverse to represent many points of view. I’m excited to work with our new Board officers, all of whom have distinguished backgrounds as advocates, especially as we launch into our essential work of increasing funding for artists and arts organizations. We are very fortunate to have these smart and savvy women leading Assembly’s board during this important time for our community,” said Jeremy V. Johnson, president and CEO of Assembly for the Arts. 

More information about Assembly’s board is available on Assembly’s website at https://assemblycle.org/about/board-of-trustees/.  

 ABOUT 

Assembly for the Arts is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization with a focus on advocacy, cultural policy, racial equity initiatives, research, marketing that elevates the region, and services for nonprofits, artists, and creative businesses. It is governed by a volunteer board with a strong commitment to diversity and inclusion. Assembly by design operates in close partnership with Cuyahoga Arts & Culture, a government agency, and Assembly for Action, a 501(c)4 political action nonprofit to serve the entire creative sector. Assembly is supported through major funding from: The Cleveland Foundation, The George Gund Foundation, The Char and Chuck Fowler Family Foundation, Cuyahoga Arts & Culture, Ohio Arts Council, Huntington, KeyBank, The George W. Codrington Charitable Foundation, Fred & Laura Beth Bidwell, and Barbara S. Robinson. www.assemblycle.org 


Announcing the 2023 Arts and Culture Honor Roll

Assembly for the Arts recognized U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown (D-OH), Ohio Senator Matt Dolan (R-24) and Cuyahoga County District 7 Councilwoman Yvonne Conwell during its annual Public Officials Recognition Breakfast. Brown, Dolan and Conwell were recognized for their contributions to arts and cultural policy and their advocacy for the creative economy in Cuyahoga County.

The Public Officials Recognition Breakfast is an annual tradition for arts and culture supporters that began in 2015. The event is an important recognition of public-private partnerships throughout creative industries in Northeast Ohio. Arts leaders, corporate representatives, artists, and community members of all kinds attend to connect and build relationships with government officials. KeyBank sponsored this year’s Public Officials Recognition Breakfast.

More information at www.assemblycle.org.

Mayor Keith Ari Benjamin, Village Of Bratenahl
Mayor Annette M. Blackwell, City Of Maple Heights
Jake Sinatra, Cuyahoga Arts & Culture
Donna Collins, Ohio Arts Council
Councilman Kevin Conwell, City of Cleveland
J Bradley Deane, Office of Senator Sherrod Brown, U.S. Senate
Mayor Benjamin Holbert III, Village Of Woodmere
Peter Lawson Jones, Ohio Arts Council
Councilman Judson Kline, Orange Village Council
Councilman Nathaniel Martin, City of East Cleveland
Jill Paulsen, Cuyahoga Arts & Culture
Tarra Petras, City Of Cleveland
David Razum, Office of Cuyahoga County Executive Chris Ronayne
Councilwoman Sandy Spinks, City of Bedford
Mayor Kim Thomas, City Of Richmond Heights
Councilmember Meredith Turner, Cuyahoga County Council

View Photos from the Breakfast

16 Local Artists Selected to Bring Transformational Projects to Redlined Communities in Cleveland

PRESS RELEASE: July 14, 2023
Media Contact: Malissa Bodmann; 216-536-7517

16 Local Artists Selected to Bring Transformational Projects to Redlined Communities in Cleveland

Assembly’s Creative Impact Fund Artists will work in 11 Cleveland neighborhoods and East Cleveland

CLEVELAND, OHIO — Assembly for the Arts has selected 16 local artists to create transformational arts projects in redlined communities that lack arts investment.

The Creative Impact Fund, funded by Cuyahoga County taxpayers through a $140,000 grant from Cuyahoga Arts & Culture, will help to develop areas of significant arts activity in Cleveland and East Cleveland. This is the first grant program for artists in Cuyahoga County that is specifically focused on investing in historically redlined neighborhoods.

Jeremy V. Johnson, president and CEO of Assembly for the Arts, said the organization is excited to launch another artist funding opportunity. “The Creative Impact Fund is in line with Assembly’s mission of expanding resources and increasing the equity in Cleveland’s arts and culture scene, translating into 16 meaningful programs and experiences for both artists and residents. We are excited to welcome the first cohort of artists and get dollars into their hands so they, in turn, can hone their practice and help the redlined communities in which they create,” he said. “Arts are a powerful tool in creating community.”

The 16 artists, their projects and neighborhood location are listed below. The artists were selected through an application and panel review process.

  • Shadi Ayoub
    Let’s Print Together! (Visual Arts, Graphic Design, and Craft; St. Clair Superior, Clark Fulton, or Asiatown)
  • Alexander Corona
    Raíces: Danzas de México (Dance; St. Clair Superior)
  • Moises De Freitas
    Afro Brazilian Cultural Appreciation Initiative (Dance, Music, Writing/Literature; East Cleveland)
  • Dale Goode
    Domestic Violence is Not Pretty (Visual Arts, East Cleveland)
  • Natasha Herbert 
    The Avenue Cleveland Youth Photography Program (Film/Media; Midtown, St. Clair Superior; Central-Kinsman; or East Cleveland)
  • Baba Jubal Harris
    Heart Beat Drum Circle (Music; East Cleveland)
  • Stephanie Lassiter
    The Girl (Film/Media; Mt. Pleasant)
  • Josh Maxwell
    ROOTED (Visual Arts; Broadway-Slavic Village)
  • Adenike Harper
    A Peace of Cake (Visual Arts; Central-Kinsman; North & South Collinwood)
  • Robin Robinson
    Recapture the Spirit of Our Community Park (Visual Arts; Glenville)
  • Georgio Sabino
    Artistic Jungle Series (Visual Arts, Fashion; Fairfax)
  • Julie Schabel
    Wave Space Summer Camps (Visual Arts; North & South Collinwood; Hough; Central-Kinsman; Union Miles; or St. Clair Superior)
  • Ben Smith
    The Splice Cream Spliced Team Dream Concert Series (Music & Visual Arts; Buckeye-Woodhill)
  • Julia Sosa
    El Romantico (Theater, Writing/Literature; Clark Fulton)
  • Mary Thomas
    U & I of Euclid Avenue (Visual Art; East Cleveland)
  • Linda Zolten Wood
    Sustainable Arts with Zolten Wood Design & Collinwood Painted Rain Barrel Project (Visual Arts, Craft; East Cleveland and North Collinwood)

The Creative Impact Fund artists receive:

  • $6,250, of which up to $2,500 is unrestricted support and $3,750 in project support
  • Professional development opportunities, valued at $2,075, supported by the Entrepreneur in Residence powered by Huntington
  • Support from Assembly’s staff who will advise project leads in attaining their project goals via marketing and professional development support and connections to institutional partners, potential collaborators or thought partners
  • Assembly for the Arts membership

Learn more at www.assemblycle.org/creativeimpactfund. Assembly for the Arts’ Creative Impact Fund is supported in part by the residents of Cuyahoga County through a public grant from Cuyahoga Arts & Culture.

ABOUT

Assembly for the Arts is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization with a focus on advocacy, cultural policy, racial equity initiatives, research, marketing that elevates the region, and services for nonprofits, artists, and creative businesses. It is governed by a volunteer board with a strong commitment to diversity and inclusion. Assembly by design operates in close partnership with Cuyahoga Arts & Culture, a government agency, and Assembly for Action, a 501(c)4 political action nonprofit to serve the entire creative sector. Assembly is supported through major funding from: The Cleveland Foundation, The George Gund Foundation, The Char and Chuck Fowler Family Foundation, Cuyahoga Arts & Culture, Ohio Arts Council, Huntington, KeyBank, The George W. Codrington Charitable Foundation, Fred & Laura Beth Bidwell, and Barbara S. Robinson. www.assemblycle.org


Artist Engagement and Planning Update

ARTIST ENGAGEMENT AND PLANNING UPDATE

Assembly for the Arts has received a grant from Cuyahoga Arts & Culture to help shape artist funding in the community. This means over the next several months, we will engage artists and residents and listen to their ideas on the best ways to support artists, both financial and non-financial.

Assembly is designing a focused listening, engagement, and planning effort with artists and residents that will result in a community-driven plan for how CAC’s 2024 Support for Artist funds will be spent.

Assembly and CAC are committed to expanding the pie and increasing equity in Cleveland’s arts and culture sector. We are excited for this next phase of our organizations’ work together.

Stay tuned for more soon. If you’d like to sign up for updates, make sure you receive our newsletter.